Thank-You, Lighthouse Docents!

Now that the fall and winter rains have started and the light grows less day by day, I am finding time to write to all of you who volunteered your time as Keepers of the Patos Lighthouse docents last spring and summer.

Though I haven’t run the numbers, (hours/guests), yet I do have the guest book here and I would like to share some of the wonderful comments our guests have left. Our guests came from near (Orcas Island, BC) and far, (Finland!), but all of them were delghted to find the lighthouse open and staffed by our wonderful volunteers. As you will see from their comments, a great and informative time was had by all.

Here are just a few of the comments:

Been waiting to visit for 25 years!
Loved the tour!
Perfect place to stop for Father’s Day!
Great interesting tour of this fine lighthouse.
Wow! What beautiful views  and interesting history!
Kayaking from Sucia. Amazing location, so beautiful!!
Great place to see! (Finland)
We looooove Patos!
Very fun to finally see the inside and the view from the Light
Yeah Lighthouse Docents, you rock!
I  wish I could be here during a storm!
Fun times on Patos. Thanks to the Lutz  boys for their tour 🙂
Thank you guys for opening the lighthouse for us…
Thanks for all your hard work. So wonderful to see old treasures taken care of.

Great Music!
Labor Day in Paradise!

Also, A big Thank-you goes out to Steve Sabine and his State Parks crew. Without them none of this would have been possible…thanks SO much for your continued support!

Last note, I know many of you docents brought friends and family along for your stints, could you make sure to forward my email to all of them?

Last, BNL….Some of you have already reserved a weekend for next year’s season. If any of the others have a certain time in mind for the 2015 season, please let me know and I will get it on the calendar.

Have a great fall and winter and (try to) enjoy the rain!

 

Katie Nollman, Lighthouse Docent took these pictures during her stint last summer…

LindaKaty Katy2 13 Katy3 Patos summer '13 010 Patos summer '13 020

“Beacons” From the Past to the Future

OJ Lougheed is one of our most knowledgeable and hard working volunteers….

 

Hello All,
Here is one of the reason why I am so interested in the local Lighthouses – “Beacons,” perhaps, from the past into the future. Please share with your mailing lists.
Having spent my “vacations” on Lake Baikal for the seven years I lived in Sunny Southern Siberia, I have a certain perspective on “Seas.”http://www.seadocsociety.org/salish-sea-facts/The Salish Sea is 53% of the surface area of Baikal – no one there calling it a mere lake. However, Baikal has only 27 islands, only one inhabited. The Salish Sea had 419 islands, most of them inhabited.
 

As a member of the joint islands “San Juans Alliance” (fighting fossil-fuel exports) I watched the afternoon presentations at the U.N. Climate Change talking session (yet another) yesterday. One presentation was particularly interesting – by “His Excellency the Honourable Baron Waqa M.P., President of the Republic of Nauru and Chair of the Alliance of Small Island States”:

http://aosis.org/aosis-climate-summit-address/

AOSIS released two papers yesterday:

So, what do a few historic lighthouses in the Salish Sea have to do with all this? Most of these “Beacons” have been powered by solar for several years. Turn Point has a large system installed for it’s Museum. A potential donor has offered to provide a golf cart for Patos, but it would need a solar recharging system (and approval by the National Monument). No doubt the plans for Burrows include solar.
I also found this statement in the Keynote from the 2014 Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference:…let me get specific. Assuming governmental policy regarding migration
remains unchanged, then the population of Salishland, currently 9 million, in 2100, will
be 25 to 30 million.
You heard right. 9 million today, 25 to 30 million in 2100. A tripling, or more.

– “Four Realities Circumscribing the Future of the Salish Sea”http://www.wwu.edu/salishseaconference/docs/2014x%20-%20Four%20Realities%20-%20Salish%20Sea%20Conference%20Keynote%20-%20Lackey%20-%20May%201,%202014.pdf
Coming to grips with the carrying capacity of the Salish Sea over this Century is important. “Beacons” – shining light on alternatives are needed.
 
As “Beacons,” the Lighthouses might also work with Community Solar Projects such as these to make an impact on young minds:http://www.sjislandscd.org/http://saltspringcommunityenergy.com/
Best,
Overend Joseph (“OJ”) Lougheed, Lopez Island

National Monument Committee!

Lopez and San Juan Island  Island Conservation Corps kids waving to us from the Lighthouse

Lopez and San Juan Island Island Conservation Corps kids waving to us from the Lighthouse

National Monument Advisory Committee Nominations Open Tomorrow

As someone on our informal Management Planning email list, you get a bit of a head start on this news. Tomorrow should see the publication of the official Federal Register announcement of the San Juan Islands National Monument Advisory Committee (the official name of our RAC). This will open nominations, which will have a deadline 45 days later. We should see a press release from BLM when the publication happens and that announcement will go to my broader list, facebook, etc. Start thinking now about who you’d like to encourage to apply for this and who you are able to write endorsement letters for.

The Federal Register has made the announcement available in pre-publication form and it will become official on February 6. The announcement indicates that the press release from BLM will contain more information about nominations. The form of the nominations will likely follow the application linked to from the BLM’s RAC page.

There are no surprises in the announcement, which is copied below. Some key points are highlighted in bold.


This document is scheduled to be published in the Federal Register on 02/06/2014 and available online at http://federalregister.gov/a/2014-02536, and on FDsys.gov

4310-33
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
Bureau of Land Management
Notice of Intent to Establish and Call for Nominations for the San Juan Islands National Monument Advisory Committee, Washington
AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior.
ACTION: Notice.

SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is publishing this notice in accordance with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA) and the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA). The BLM gives notice that the Secretary of the Interior is establishing the San Juan Islands National Monument Advisory Committee. This notice also solicits nominations for members of the public to sit on the Committee. The Committee will provide information and advice regarding the development of the National Monument’s management plan as stated in the Presidential Proclamation establishing the Monument.

DATES: All nominations must be received by [INSERT DATE 45 DAYS AFTER DATE OF PUBLICATION IN THE FEDERAL REGISTER].
ADDRESSES: Nominations should be submitted to Daniel Picard, BLM Spokane District Manager, 1103 N. Fancher Road, Spokane, WA 99212, Attention: RAC Nominations.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Daniel Picard, BLM Spokane District Manager, 509-536-1200.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FLPMA (43 U. S. C. 1739) directs the Secretary of the Interior to involve the public in planning and issues related to management of lands administered by the BLM. Section 309 of FLPMA directs the Secretary to establish 10-to-15-member citizen-based advisory councils that are consistent with FACA. The rules governing RACs are found at 43 CFR subpart 1784. As required by FACA, Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) membership must be balanced and representative of the various interests concerned with the management of the public lands. The San Juan Islands National Monument Advisory Committee will be composed of 12 members: 2 members representing recreation and tourism interests, 2 members representing wildlife and ecological interests, 2 members representing cultural and heritage interests, 2 public-at-large members, 1 member representing tribal interests, 1 member representing local government, 1 member representing education and interpretation interests, and 1 member representing private landowners. Individuals may nominate themselves or others. Nominees must be residents of the district in which the RAC has jurisdiction. The BLM will evaluate nominees based on their education, training, experience, and knowledge of the geographic area of the RAC. Nominees should demonstrate a commitment to collaborative resource decision-making. The Obama Administration prohibits individuals who are currently federally registered lobbyists to serve on all FACA and non-FACA boards, committees or councils. The following must accompany all nominations.

  • Letters of reference from represented interests or organizations;
  • A completed background information nomination form; and
  • Any other information that addresses the nominee’s qualifications.

Simultaneous with this notice, the BLM Spokane District Office will issue a press release providing additional information for submitting nominations, with the specifics about the number and categories of member positions available.

CERTIFICATION STATEMENT: I certify that the BLM San Juan Islands National Monument Advisory Committee is necessary and in the public interest in connection with the Secretary’s responsibilities to manage the lands, resources and facilities administered by the BLM.
(Authority: 43 CFR 1784.4-1).
Dated: Jan. 24, 2014.
_____________________________
Sally Jewell,
Secretary of the Interior.
[FR Doc. 2014-02536 Filed 02/05/2014 at 8:45 am; Publication Date: 02/06/2014]

Copyright © 2014 Tom Reeve, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you expressed interest in remaining closely involved with the process for creating the Resource Management Plan for the San Juan Islands National Monument.
Our mailing address is:

Tom Reeve

778 Flint Road

Lopez Island, WA 98261

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In the news….

We are sure enjoying these stories,,,,video this time!

 

http://www.komonews.com/news/local/San-Juan-Islands-celebrate-national-monument-designation-200964321.html?tab=video

The Full Text…

Here is the full text of the National Monument Proclamation.  The wording is really beautiful. What a day!

 

Presidential Proclamation — San Juan Islands National Monument

ESTABLISHMENT OF THE SAN JUAN ISLANDS NATIONAL MONUMENT

– – – – – – –

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

Within Washington State’s Puget Sound lies an archipelago of over 450 islands, rocks, and pinnacles known as the San Juan Islands. These islands form an unmatched landscape of contrasts, where forests seem to spring from gray rock and distant, snow-capped peaks provide the backdrop for sandy beaches. Numerous wildlife species can be found here, thriving in the diverse habitats supported by the islands. The presence of archeological sites, historic lighthouses, and a few tight-knit communities testifies that humans have navigated this rugged landscape for thousands of years. These lands are a refuge of scientific and historic treasures and a classroom for generations of Americans.

The islands are part of the traditional territories of the Coast Salish people. Native people first used the area near the end of the last glacial period, about 12,000 years ago. However, permanent settlements were relatively uncommon until the last several hundred years. The Coast Salish people often lived in villages of wooden-plank houses and used numerous smaller sites for fishing and harvesting shellfish. In addition to collecting edible plants, and hunting various birds and mammals, native people used fire to maintain meadows of the nutritionally rich great camas. Archaeological remains of the villages, camps, and processing sites are located throughout these lands, including shell middens, reef net locations, and burial sites. Wood-working tools, such as antler wedges, along with bone barbs used for fishing hooks and projectile points, are also found on the islands. Scientists working in the San Juan Islands have uncovered a unique array of fossils and other evidence of long-vanished species. Ancient bison skeletons (10,000-12,000 years old) have been found in several areas, indicating that these islands were an historic mammal dispersal corridor. Butcher marks on some of these bones suggest that the earliest human inhabitants hunted these large animals.

The first Europeans explored the narrows of the San Juan Islands in the late 18th century, and many of their names for the islands are still in use. These early explorers led the way for 19th century European and American traders and trappers. By 1852, American settlers had established homesteads on the San Juan Islands, some of which remain today. In the late 19th century, the Federal Government built several structures to aid in maritime navigation. Two light stations and their associated buildings are located on lands administered by the

Bureau of Land Management (BLM): Patos Island Light Station (National Register of Historic Places, 1977) and Turn Point Light Station (Washington State Register of Historic Places, 1978).

The lands on Patos Island, Stuart Island, Lopez Island, and neighboring islands constitute some of the most scientifically interesting lands in the San Juan Islands. These lands contain a dramatic and unusual diversity of habitats, with forests, woodlands, grasslands, and wetlands intermixed with rocky balds, bluffs, inter-tidal areas, and sandy beaches. The stands of forests and open woodlands, some of which are several hundred years old, include a majestic assemblage of trees, such as Douglas fir, red cedar, western hemlock, Oregon maple, Garry oak, and Pacific madrone. The fire-dependent grasslands, which are also susceptible to invasive species, are home to chick lupine, historically significant great camas, brittle cactus, and the threatened golden paintbrush. Rocky balds and bluffs are home to over 200 species of moss that are extremely sensitive to disturbance and trampling. In an area with limited fresh water, two wetlands on Lopez Island and one on Patos Island are the most significant freshwater habitats in the San Juan Islands.

The diversity of habitats in the San Juan Islands is critical to supporting an equally varied collection of wildlife. Marine mammals, including orcas, seals, and porpoises, attract a regular stream of wildlife watchers. Native, terrestrial mammals include black-tail deer, river otter, mink, several bats, and the Shaw Island vole. Raptors, such as bald eagles and peregrine falcons, are commonly observed soaring above the islands. Varied seabirds and terrestrial birds can also be found here, including the threatened marbled murrelet and the recently reintroduced western bluebird. The island marble butterfly, once thought to be extinct, is currently limited to a small population in the San Juan Islands.

The protection of these lands in the San Juan Islands will maintain their historical and cultural significance and enhance their unique and varied natural and scientific resources, for the benefit of all Americans.

WHEREAS section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431) (the “Antiquities Act”), authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare by public proclamation historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or scientific interest that are situated upon the lands owned or controlled by the Government of the United States to be national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof parcels of land, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of the objects to be protected;

WHEREAS it is in the public interest to preserve the objects of scientific and historic interest on the lands of the San Juan Islands;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 of the Antiquities Act, hereby proclaim the objects identified above that are situated upon lands and interests in

lands owned or controlled by the Government of the United States to be the San Juan Islands National Monument (monument), and, for the purpose of protecting those objects, reserve as a part thereof all lands and interests in lands owned or controlled by the Government of the United States and administered by the Department of the Interior through the BLM, including all unappropriated or unreserved islands, rocks, exposed reefs, and pinnacles above mean high tide, within the boundaries described on the accompanying map, which is attached to and forms a part of this proclamation. These reserved Federal lands and interests in lands encompass approximately 970 acres, which is the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of the objects to be protected.

All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries of the monument administered by the Department of the Interior through the BLM are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from all forms of entry, location, selection, sale, leasing, or other disposition under the public land laws, including withdrawal from location, entry, and patent under the mining laws, and from disposition under all laws relating to mineral and geothermal leasing, other than by exchange that furthers the protective purposes of this proclamation.

The establishment of the monument is subject to valid existing rights. Lands and interests in lands within the monument boundaries not owned or controlled by the Government of the United States shall be reserved as a part of the monument upon acquisition of ownership or control by the Secretary of the Interior (Secretary) on behalf of the United States.

The Secretary shall manage the monument through the BLM as a unit of the National Landscape Conservation System, pursuant to applicable legal authorities, to implement the purposes of this proclamation, except that if the Secretary hereafter acquires on behalf of the United States ownership or control of any lands or interests in lands within the monument boundaries not owned or controlled by the United States, the Secretary shall determine whether such lands and interests in lands will be administered by the BLM as a unit of the National Landscape Conservation System or by another component of the Department of the Interior, consistent with applicable legal authorities.

For purposes of protecting and restoring the objects identified above, the Secretary, through the BLM, shall prepare and maintain a management plan for the monument and shall establish an advisory committee under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) to provide information and advice regarding the development of such plan.

Except for emergency, Federal law enforcement, or authorized administrative purposes, motorized vehicle use in the monument shall be permitted only on designated roads, and non-motorized mechanized vehicle use in the monument shall be permitted only on designated roads and trails.

Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or diminish the rights of any Indian tribe. The Secretary shall, in consultation with Indian tribes, ensure the protection of religious and cultural sites in the monument and provide access to the sites by members of Indian tribes for traditional cultural and customary uses, consistent with the American Indian Religious Freedom Act (42 U.S.C. 1996) and Executive Order 13007 of May 24, 1996 (Indian Sacred Sites).

Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or diminish the jurisdiction or authority of the State of Washington or the United States over submerged or other lands within the territorial waters off the coast of Washington.

Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or diminish the jurisdiction of the State of Washington with respect to fish and wildlife management.

Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to limit the authority of the Secretary of Homeland Security to engage in search and rescue operations, or to use Patos Island Light Station, Turn Point Light Station, or other aids to navigation for navigational or national security purposes.

Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any existing withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, the monument shall be the dominant reservation.

Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to restrict safe and efficient aircraft operations, including activities and exercises of the Armed Forces and the United States Coast Guard, in the vicinity of the monument.

Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to appropriate, injure, destroy, or remove any feature of the monument and not to locate or settle upon any of the lands thereof.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-fifth day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand thirteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-seventh.

BARACK OBAMA

Purge the Spurge!

All of us at Keepers of course have other lives, and this is true for our volunteer activities as well. So when fearless BLM Leader Nick Teague announced a “Volunteer Appreciation Day” to be held on Victim Island, I jumped at the chance. Of course as Nick’s meaning of  “Volunteer Appreciation” usually means slaving away for hours in the hot sun in some god forsaken (but beautiful) place, I knew I was once again signing up for some hard work.

I was right. Nick’s team for the day was to journey to Victim Island (in Westsound, Orcas Island) and spend the day pulling a nasty smelling noxious weed known as Spurge Laurel. Nick explained that Spurge Laurel is a garden escapee that likes to grow in the shade; really bad news for the Pacific Northwest. Why it is a “garden escapee” mystifies me as the plant looks like an unwatered rhododendron and, when cut,  smells like a cross between sewer gas and kerosene. Who would want it in their garden?

After an initial safety talk (this time including how to protect ourselves from allergic reactions to plant sap) we headed off to rid the island (partially) of this highly invasive weed. Our method was to cut down everything in a wide perimeter of the island and to leave the heavily infested shaded center for another day.

After a lunch with a view, (always a given on Nick’s volunteer days), we continued our attack on the Laurel. After about 5 hours of work we had circled back to our starting point and there was time for a wash up and photo-op before our boat arrived to pick us up and take us back to civilization.

Oh, and Victim Island? Here is the entry from Tacoma Public Library’s database “Washington State Place names”:

Victim Island is southeast of Deer Harbor in West Sound in north central San Juan County. It was charted under this name in 1858 by Capt. Henry G. Richards, of the Royal Navy because it showed evidence of massacre of local Indians by Haida Indians from the Queen Charlotte Islands. Indians from the Queen Charlotte Islands raided the Indian villages along the shores of Puget Sound killing the men and taking the women and children as slaves and destroying everything that could not be taken as loot. 1 record displayed